walkway

When it comes to Hudson Valley sights and attractions, visitors have so much to choose from. Below we have listed some of our favorites. For a more complete listing, check out the Dutchess County Tourism website or the Ulster County Tourism website.

Walkway Over the Hudson (state park)
Poughkeepsie Entrance
61 Parker Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
845/834-2867
www.walkway.org/
nysparks.com/regions/taconic/default.aspx

Walkway Over the Hudson State Historic Park is a linear walkway spanning the Hudson River. At 212 feet tall and 1.28 miles long, it is the longest, elevated pedestrian bridge in the world. The park is managed and maintained by NYS Parks – Taconic Region

Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College (art gallery)
124 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie
845/437-5237
fllac.vassar.edu/

Vassar was the first college or university in the country to include an art museum as part of its original plan. The current 36,000 square foot facility was designed by Cesar Pelli and named in honor of a member of the Class of 1928. The Center’s collections chart the history of art from antiquity to the present and comprise over 18,000 works.

Powerhouse Theater (seasonal theater & film)
Vassar College
124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie
845/437-5907
powerhouse.vassar.edu/index.html

The summertime Powerhouse Theater, a collaboration between New York Stage and Film and Vassar College, is dedicated to both emerging and established artists in the development and production of new works for theater and film.

Locust Grove—Samuel Morse Historic Site
2683 South Rd (Rte. 9), Poughkeepsie, NY
845/454-4500
www.lgny.org

Locust Grove, a 150-acre estate and Tuscan-style villa, was purchased by Samuel Morse, painter-turned-inventor. The 19th-century artist invented the electric telegraph and Morse code and made a fortune. The property has a man-made lake, waterfall, and lovely gardens. A recent addition to the estate is a small museum dedicated to the life, art, and inventions of Morse, and an excellent visitor center that shows a film on the estate and Morse’s life.

Culinary Institute of America (school, restaurants, open for tours)
1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park, NY
845/451-1588
www.ciachef.edu

The nation’s oldest culinary arts school and only residential college in the world dedicated to culinary training, the CIA is open for tours (not to mention culinary “boot camps” for serious nonprofessionals). See the website for information about when during the year its open and dining options.

Minnewaska State Park Preserve
U.S. 44/Rte. 55, 5 mi from Rte. 299, New Paltz, NY
845/255-0752
www.nysparks.com

The park encompasses 12,000 acres in the Shawangunk Mountains. Much of the terrain is wooded and rocky, but you will also come across trickling streams, gushing waterfalls, and spectacular valley views.

Mohonk Mountain House (hotel, spa, hiking trails)
1000 Mountain Rest Road, New Paltz, NY
800/772-6646
www.mohonk.com

Surrounded by thousands of acres of unspoiled forest and winding trails, this seven-story Victorian castle hotel has successfully maintained its distinct 19th-century character into the 21st century. If you do not have an overnight reservation, you may visit Mohonk Mountain House by purchasing a meal, a spa treatment, or a grounds pass for access to the property.

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site
4097 Albany Post Road
1-800-FDR-VISIT
www.nps.gov/hofr

FDR once said, “All that is within me cries out to go back to my home on the Hudson River.” This quote captures FDR’s connection to Springwood, the estate that he loved and the place he considered home.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum
4079 Albany Post Road
1-800-FDR-VISIT
www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum is America’s first presidential library—and the only one used by a sitting president. It was conceived and built under President Roosevelt’s direction and opened to the public in 1941.

The Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site at Val-Kill
Hyde Park, NY
Rte. 9G, Hyde Park
845/229-9115
www.nps.gov/elro

Both Eleanor Roosevelt and FDR grew up in the Hudson River Valley. After his death, Eleanor—one of the most admired and influential women in American history—lived and worked out of Val-Kill Cottage, the only home she ever owned. A simple, rustic home, Val-Kill is where Eleanor received world leaders and made her mark on civil rights legislation and international humanitarian issues.

The Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site
Rte. 9, Hyde Park, East Side of the Hudson
845/229-9115
www.nps.gov/vama

This lavish estate was the home of wealthy 19th-century industrialist Frederick William Vanderbilt. The 54-room country palace was built in 1898 and is one of the first steel-framed houses in the U.S.

Dia:Beacon (art museum)
3 Beekman St, Beacon, NY
845/440-0100
www.diabeacon.org

In what used to be a Nabisco box-printing factory, the Dia Art Foundation has created the world’s largest contemporary-art museum. The new museum houses Dia’s rarely seen permanent collection of pivotal conceptual, minimalist, and Earth artists, mostly men who came of age in the 1960s and 1970s.